The Problem with Android is Choice

The Problem is ChoiceAndroid is flexible. Most reviews tout that as a key advantage of the operating system, particularly when it’s being compared with iOS. To quote recent switcher Andy Ihknato:

Android has a consistent core philosophy that I find instinctively compelling: why wouldn’t a phone give its sole user a vote on how their device works?

Here’s why that’s a bad idea: Choice reduces user satisfaction. Choice reduces usability. Choice reduces product quality.

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3 comments
MichealLe1
MichealLe1

ngắn nhưng mà không theo thèm muốn của loài người nam giới Lúc giao hợp đối với bạn tình. Đây đúng là tình trạng và mỗi các cách quan hệ

congtysangoviet1
congtysangoviet1

Android has a consistent core philosophy that công ty sàn gỗ việt I find instinctively compelling: why wouldn’t a phone give its sole user a vote on how their device works?

Here’s why that’s a bad idea: Choice reduces user satisfaction. Choice reduces usability. Choice reduces product quality.

SanayaIrani
SanayaIrani

While I agree that the difficulty of Android for programmers is there, I disagree with some of your arguments and examples.


Lets look at your Windows 8 example. Microsoft broke a mold that business relied on for the past 20 years, and did little to help developers move their applications to the “Metro” interface. Yes, users do switch to the old UI, but if their applications aren’t “Metro” compatible, then they are not given the option to embrace the new UI. Microsoft has a captive audience, but poor choices are leaving software developers to deal with a new UI and users who won’t upgrade. Rather than make a new application for “Metro” they are improving their application and continuing to use Explorer.


http://goresult.in/